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Statistics

CVD and CHD – What it costs


The cost to the NHS

Cardiovascular Disease cost the health care system in the UK around £14,750 million in 2003. This represents a cost per capita of just under £250. The cost of hospital care for people who have CVD accounted for about 76% of these costs (drugs and the dispensing of them, about 18%).

CHD cost the health care system in the UK around £3,500 million in 2003. This represents a cost per capita of just under £60. The cost of hospital care for people who have CHD accounted for about 79% of these costs (drugs and the dispensing them, about 16%).

Non-health care costs
Looking only at the cost of CVD to the health care system grossly underestimates the total cost of CVD in the UK. Production losses from death and illness in those of working age and from the informal care of people with the disease contribute greatly to the overall financial burden.

In 2003, production losses due to mortality and morbidity associated with CVD cost the UK over £6,200 million, with around 60% of this cost (£3,677 million) due to death and 40% (£2,556 million) due to illness in those of working age. The cost of informal care for people with CVD in the UK was over £4,800 million in 2003.

In 2003, production losses due to mortality and morbidity associated with CHD cost the UK over £3,100 million, with around 70% of this cost (£2,173 million) due to death and 30% (£961 million) due to illness in those of working age. The cost of informal care for people with CHD in the UK was around £1,250 million in 2003.

Total costs
Overall CVD is estimated to cost the UK economy just under £26 billion a year.
This represents an overall cost per capita of £434. Of the total cost of CVD to the UK, around 57% is due to direct health care costs, 24% to productivity losses and 19% to the informal care of people with CVD.

Overall CHD is estimated to cost the UK economy over £7.9 billion a year. This represents a cost per capita of £133. Of the total cost of CHD to the UK, around 45% is due to direct health care costs, 40% to productivity losses, and 16% to the informal care of people with CHD.

Ref: www.heartstats.org

SMOKING - THE FACTS 

Smoking Prevalence
In November 2004 the Health Development Agency reported that the smoking prevalence in Merseyside was over 31%, which is higher than prevalence for the rest of England (27%)

In seven out of the nine Merseyside PCT areas, prevalence is greater than 30% and in one area this figure reaches 40%. Evidence from other countries shows that going smoke free supports smokers to stop.

The Facts

  • Every year in Greater Merseyside around 3,500 people die from smoking-related causes. This figure includes 718 premature deaths that could be prevented if people didn't smoke.
  • Secondhand smoke can increase the risk of contracting lung cancer or heart disease by a quarter. 86% of Merseyside residents would prefer public places to be smoke free.
  • Being in a room with a smoker exposes you to more than 4,000 chemicals including 60 known cancer-causing substances.

If you are searching for additional information, The King's Fund offers access to free health publications, articles and briefings and links to over 2,000 related organisations via their website www.kingsfund.org.uk